How to use copper pipe plumbing

Normal copper pipe plumbing and galvanized lines are run in a straight line usually both hot and cold side by side with tees or branches servicing each fixture. Metal lines are not complicated things by any means. They are more expensive than vinyl tubing, but they are really kind of fun to put together and the value of the home will be a little higher.



There are many different fittings that make the job easier for copper pipe plumbing. You start out by measuring the pipe to the length you need, then you cut it with a pipe cutter.
Metal lines are not complicated things by any means. They are more expensive than vinyl tubing, but they are really kind of fun to put together and the value of the home will be a little higher.

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There are many different fittings that make the job easier for copper plumbing. You start out by measuring the pipe to the length you need, then you cut it with a pipe cutter.

After cutting the pipe you will need to clean out the inside with a burr remover. Once the pipe is burred, shine the end with an emery cloth.


copper pipes



After the pipe is cut, burred, and polished, it is connected by a process called “sweating”. First, you take the pipe and brush on some soldering paste or rosin flux.

This also helps clean the pipe while it’s being heated. Apply the paste to the outside of the pipe and the inside of the fitting.

After joining, take a propane torch and heat the pipe and fitting thoroughly to the point where the paste starts to sizzle. At this point, you move the flame about an inch down the pipe away from the joint and touch the joint with solder.

If the pipe is hot enough, it will suck the solder into the joint and make a complete circle around the joint, making a tight seal.


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After you melt the solder into the joint, carefully wipe away any excess solder with a heavy cloth. Don’t forget that the pipe is hot! Piece by piece, you will install the pipes in this manner.


copper pipe plumbing

You will probably have to bore a few holes in the joists and wall studs to run the pipes through. You need to be extra careful while working close to the framing not to catch things on fire. Just to be sure, you may want to have a garden hose ready to extinguish any flames.

Also, you need to make sure that you have adequate ventilation while using a propane torch. Not all the gas that escapes the nozzle gets burned up and it can build up in a confined place and ignite. That’s never good.

So to run a copper waterline we know that a main line runs to the water heater, then branches off from the water heater and goes into a cold line and a hot line. The two lines will run as far as the furthest fixture with branches or tees servicing all the fixtures between.


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