Designing architect house plans with blueprints and blueprint symbols

Most building inspectors will want to see the architect-house-plans right off of the architect drafting table so they can make sure the building project is accurate. Architects will also need to be sure to follow all local codes and regulations. That’s why it’s important to hire someone that knows local building codes and restrictions.

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The Building Inspector will need complete house plans with elevation measurements and property descriptions. Duplicate plans may be required.

Once you get approved, you will receive usually two copies of the building permit, one copy to keep for your records and another to put at your building site to last through the entire construction project.

The Building Inspector will help you find the other inspectors for the Electrical, Plumbing, and Health codes. There may be other permits necessary depending on your city and county governments and the amount of needless bureaucrats sponging off the taxpayers. Don’t worry, the permit fees for everything other than the Building Permit, are minimal.

I’ll briefly cover the individual permits so an idea of what to expect can be established. It really helps knowing what you’re up against. I sure wished somebody would have sat me down and prepped me on all the permits and codes, but I had to learn from experience.


inpectors
It seemed like I had my knickers in a twist right from the get-go and it lasted the whole three years until the house was finished.Good architect designed house plans are usually needed so the inspector can get the same idea as the builder about a structure.



Many inspectors will demand professionally made blueprints. If that’s the case, it could cost easily over a thousand dollars to have them made. The way I see it, you’ll have to pay that fee whether you build your house or a contractor does it for you. If your inspector doesn’t demand professionally made house-blueprints, then you can save a lot by doing them yourself.

Blueprints used to be blue and they was printed on a special paper that let the light show through so all the lines and symbols had better clarity. Many different kinds of paper is used in the modern day and so are many kinds of printers.

With that in mind, inspectors are less concerned about the type of paper and ink. They just really need to see the diagrams and understand all the details.

If the owner wants to save some money on architect fees or she can get some software that makes oversized copies or they can even just go buy paper that’s at least 18″X 24″ and do their own construction plans.

If you buy the software, you can take your plans on a CD to a print shop somewhere and they can print off your plans on wide format paper.

If you’re like me, you’d rather do it all yourself on a big table with a yardstick. Buy lot’s of papers to allow for mistakes though.

Now, to start out, most architectural plans are 1/4-inch = 1 foot in scale. That means that every one-quarter of an inch on the plans represents one whole foot of the real house. One full inch on the plans would equal four whole feet of the real house. This is how we are all able to get our brains wrapped around something that hasn’t happened yet.

If it helps, you can draw in your own grid so you can keep everything to scale. Try to keep the grid squares almost transparent so you can see your diagrams and symbols. You can also make your own grid in Excel. That’s easy too.

houseplangallery.com

Now, Draw your outside walls first, then draw the inside walls after that. You should be able to keep everything even with the grid paper. You might just want to start out with an 8.5 X 11-inch sheet of science paper and then take it to a print shop and have them kick out several 18 X 24-inch copies of your floor plans. That also works really well. From that point, you can write in the Architectural, Electrical, and Plumbing Symbols.

One thing to remember is to write down the scale size right below the diagrams so everybody understands the perspective. This is necessary because not all plans are the same scale.
If it helps, you can draw in your own grid so you can keep everything to scale. Try to keep the grid squares almost transparent so you can see your diagrams and symbols. You can also make your own grid in Excel. That’s easy too.

Now, Draw your outside walls first, then draw the inside walls after that. You should be able to keep everything even with the grid paper. You might just want to start out with an 8.5 X 11-inch sheet of science paper and then take it to a print shop and have them kick out several 18 X 24-inch copies of your floor plans. That also works really well. From that point, you can write in the Architectural, Electrical, and Plumbing Symbols.


electric symbols



architect symbols



One thing to remember is to write down the scale size right below the diagrams so everybody understands the perspective. This is necessary because not all plans are the same scale.

With the information you have, you can now create your own architect house plans using the symbols above. The building inspector just needs to get a clear idea of what is going on in your mind. That’s why he or she will need certain types of construction blueprints from different angles.

Don’t get discouraged, this looks harder than it really is. Here they are, and I will explain each kind:

Plans the inspector will need:

  • Foundation Plan
  • Floor Plan
  • Elevations
  • Details
  • Sections
  • Interior Elevations

Foundation Plan -This plan shows how the foundation should be built according to the information from the soil sample.It shows how deep into the ground footings will go.

It also shows the dimensions of the concrete foundation wall and any columns or blocks used in the foundation. It also shows the size of floor joists and how they are spaced. Finally, it needs to show the vent locations in the concrete foundation walls. Most architectural engineers will know the code requirements before they draw up the plans.


foundation plan



And here is an architect’s drawing for the footings and the foundation wall. It’s usually necessary to get below frost level to avoid expansion under the footing. The inspector will be looking for that.


footings



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